Cervical Cancer Survivor Relies on a Plan

Most women who are faced with hair loss opt for at least one wig and alternate wearing the wig(s) with hats and scarves.

What should I do to prepare for hair loss?

  • Make sure you will need a wig. Not all chemo causes hair loss.
  • If your hair is long, consider having it cut short so that switching to a wig or other headwear will be less noticeable.
  • Hair generally falls out 2-3 weeks after your first chemo treatment.
  • Once it starts falling out, consider having your head shaved (use an electric razor to avoid cuts).
  • This can make you feel more in control and keeps you from waking up to find itchy hair all over your pillow.
  • If you still need something to catch the hair, you may want to buy a Mesh Cap.

Hair usually grows back about six months after chemotherapy ends. Your new hair may be curlier or straighter, thicker or finer—or even a new color. Usually this change is short term; with time your hair will very likely go back to the way it was before treatment.

What kind of wig should I buy?

After hearing they will lose their hair, some women rush out and buy a real hair wig.

Many regret it: In addition to being expensive, real hair wigs require a lot of upkeep. Synthetic wigs are much easier to maintain and they look and feel natural. With the money you save you can try different style synthetic wigs—even different colors. As one of our customers wrote:

 

All three of my “tlc”™ wigs look as good as the one I bought for $300! I bought each one in a different color. My husband thinks I look great!

- Sally M., Fresno, CA

Choosing a color.

  • As we age, a lighter color is often more flattering and gives a softer, more natural look.
  • Chemo can make your face look pale. If you have black hair, consider choosing dark brown for a more flattering look.
  • If you’re a brunette and going grey, consider choosing a wig in a lighter shade of brown, possibly with subtle highlights.
  • White is very flattering, too. Be adventurous!
  • Now is your chance to experiment without paying for a long, expensive salon dye job.